WEIGHT MANAGEMENT THERAPY PROGRAM

Yo-yo dieting and vicious weight loss cycles are ineffective in the long-term management of weight. As we age, it becomes more difficult to maintain a healthy weight. USA Sports Medicine’s weight management protocol is a physician-supervised program designed to help any individual reach his or her specific weight loss goals.  Our weight loss prescriptions are not a substitute for regular exercise and a healthy diet, but they can boost metabolism, enhance energy levels, burn fat, and speed weight loss. Once a healthier weight is achieved, our compounds can help keep the weight off to help you meet your wellness goals.

 

CJC 1295

WHAT IS CJC 1295?

CJC 1295 is a synthetically produced peptide that can increase your plasma growth hormone levels. CJC 1295 is usually injected into your body via a subcutaneous injection.  CJC 1295 can increase your IGF-1 levels and GH (growth hormone) levels in humans and in animals.  Initially, CJC 1295 was developed to treat diseases and medical conditions for patients who had muscle disorders, diseases, and burn victims. CJC 1295 has drawn many individuals like athletes from around the globe for its incredible benefits and minimal side effects to enhance their performance on the field and in the gym.

 

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF USING CJC-1295?

Lean body mass, gains in muscle mass, and increased strength. These are just a few of the benefits which CJC-1295 will deliver upon. It is a long-acting GHRH analog or  (growth hormone-releasing hormone). The lifespan for releasing growth hormones is promulgated by tetrahedral modifications of CJC-1295.  Therapeutic effects are increased because of this, and users require fewer injections in comparison to other growth hormones. These are just a few of the benefits CJC-1295 users will appreciate in comparison to other growth hormone injections available on the market. 

 

WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS? 

CJC-1295 side effects may be present as the growth hormone relates to the stimulation of the pituitary gland. An increase in vasodilation is often associated with the surge of the growth hormone into the user’s body. This typically lasts for a period of 30 minutes to 2 hours, post-injection.

Additionally, itching, pain, redness, and soreness are often noted as side effects at the injection point, although this is not reported with all users. HGH levels also increase at the cellular level once CJC-1295 is injected. Research suggests this can lead to increased muscle strength, fat metabolism, and muscular mass. Improved skin tone and muscle definition are also noted. Those who want to further enhance CJC-1295 effects will find that proper diet and exercise regimens will help in doing just that.

WILL CJC-1295 CAUSE WATER RETENTION? 

Because it stimulates the pituitary gland, those who are using higher doses of CJC-1295 might notice water retention in their body. Simply skip a dose, or reduce intake levels of sodium if you notice this issue. Water retention and increased levels of tiredness have also been reported by some users. After a couple of weeks, once the body has adapted, these issues typically resolve themselves. For those who notice these issues, it might be necessary to change your injection schedule, and only inject the CJC-1295 prior to bedtime, as opposed to in the morning hours.

 

CJC-1295 with IPAMORELIN

CJC-1295 is combined with Ipamorelin due to the synergistic effects and increased GH release levels. This will decrease cortisol and prolactin levels, in comparison to GHRP 2 and GHRP 6.  Using them together allows a fivefold increase in benefits, using the same doses since they work on different receptors.

 

WHAT IS IPAMORELIN? 

Ipamorelin is a growth releasing hormone; what this means is that if your body doesn’t produce enough, or if you are deficient, supplementing with Ipamorelin can help. It can be used as an alternative to GHRP-2 or GHRP-6. Users will experience similar results and gains, minus the documented side effects which are common with these two supplements. 

Using Ipamorelin alongside your exercise and diet regimen is going to help you achieve said goal. No two users are alike. For athletes or those who workout religiously, you might experience greater results than an individual who is overweight and just getting back into the gym after 10 years.

 

HOW DO I TAKE CJC-1295 AND IPAMORELIN?

These injections are done nightly on 5 consecutive nights per week.  This is a small injection, the size of an insulin needle. It is placed into your belly fat. IPAMORELIN is dosed at 5 units nightly. CJC-1295 is also dosed 5 units nightly.  A combination injection of IPAMORELIN and CJC-1295 is administered at 10 units nightly.

Note: These are best taken on an empty stomach. It is advised that these are taken at least 90 minutes after your final caloric intake of the night. 

FAT LOSS SHOT

These are lipotropic agents which help with the breakdown of fat during metabolism in the body. Often referred to as “fat burning” injections, these components, especially inositol and choline, have been found to improve mental function and feelings of depression.  These are done in the office once per week.

 

WHAT IS IN THE FAT LOSS SHOT?

Methionine: an essential amino acid, helps the liver break down fats, lowers cholesterol, relieves fatigue, and helps allergies by lowering histamine release.

Inositol: Helps the breakdown of fats, lowers cholesterol, and helps control mood and appetite.

Choline: Healthy nerve cells, cuts muscle recovery time, helps convert fat to energy 

Cyanocobalamin: Energy, healthy nerve cells 

L-Carnitine: Assist in converting body fat to fuel carbohydrate metabolism

Thiamine: Improves immune system, helps convert fat & carbohydrates into energy 

Riboflavin: Increases metabolism, suppresses appetite 

Pyridoxine: Promotes red blood cell production + converts food to energy 

Methylcobalamin: Energy, healthy nerve cells, helps convert fat to energy

 

HOW DO I TAKE THE FAT LOSS SHOT?

This injection is given to you once per week in the office into the muscle of your arm, leg, or buttock.

 

NALTREXONE TABLETS

Naltrexone was first approved by the FDA in 1984 to treat opioid addiction. Later on, it was discovered that low-dose naltrexone (LDN)—low dose being one-tenth of naltrexone’s usual dose—has anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects. LDN appears to be safe with few side effects and no abuse potential. It is also cost-effective because only a small amount is needed. Research on LDN also demonstrated improvements in other diseases. 

  • May help decrease insulin levels which can improve growth hormone levels in patients.
  • Growth hormone helps the body burn fat and maintain lean muscle mass.
  • May help normalize appetite and reduce hunger.
  • Some studies have shown to reduce general inflammation throughout the body.
  • Naltrexone may help to “normalize” this mismatch between calories burned and appetite, especially in patients with hormonal imbalances.

 

WHAT ARE THE POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF LOW-DOSE NALTREXONE?

The most common side effect of LDN is vivid dreams or sleep disturbances. These symptoms usually only last a few days, and completely dissipate after about 2 weeks. If you cannot tolerate the side effects you can take it in the am for 2 weeks then try taking it in the evening. Nausea, headaches, stomach cramps and diarrhea (rare), flu like symptoms, irritability have also been reported in a minority of patients. It has been noted an intolerance to alcohol use while taking LDN and has been used to treat alcoholism. Decreased food and sugar cravings in food addicted persons. 

 

HOW DO I TAKE NALTREXONE?

Naltrexone is a tablet or capsule. Dosing is either 1.5mg, 2mg, or 3mg nightly. It is taken once per day, at bedtime.

 

5-Amino-1MQ

WHAT IS 5-AMINO-1MQ?

5-Amino-1MQ is a small, selective, membrane permeable molecule that is an inhibitor of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT), a cytosolic enzyme that plays a role in cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis. NNMT has been found to be up-regualted in white adipose tissue of mice compared to other tissues, thus, NNMT is an ideal target for anti-obesity medication. 5-amino-1MQ is a derivative of methylquinolinium (MQ) which has exhibited a high efficacy in NNMT inhibition, cell viability, and membrane permeability. It did not have any effect on the activity of any other enzymes in the relevant metabolic cycles, therefore reducing the risks of potential side effects. This NNMT inhibitor could be used to prevent adipogenesis and type II diabetes and reverse diet-induced obesity as a result of increased intracellular NAD+ and SAM. In a study using diet-induced obese mice fed a high fat diet, the effects of 5-amino-1MQ on obesity measures and plasma lipid were evaluated. After 11 days, mice treated with 5-amino-1MQ lost weight, exhibited a 30% decrease in white adipose mass and cholesterol levels, and displayed reduced lipogenesis. They also displayed a 6% loss in body weight in this time period.  The results of this study validate NNMT as a practical target to treat obesity and related metabolic conditions and support the development of an NNMT inhibitor therapeutics to reverse diet-induced obesity.

 

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF 5-AMINO-1MQ?

  • Weight Loss
  • Increased Muscle Mass
  • Slows Down Signs of Aging
  • Decreased Insulin Resistance
  • Anti-Inflammatory Effects
  • Decreased Muscle Soreness After Workouts
  • Increased Energy Levels
  • Decreased Cholesterol Levels

 

WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF 5-AMINO-1MQ?

The studies surrounding 5-Amino-1MQ all point to a favorable side effect profile.  If taken too late in the day, some patients report difficulty sleeping.  At the beginning of treatment, patients will sometimes report decreased exercise tolerance with cardiovascular exercise.

 

HOW DO I TAKE 5-AMINO-1MQ?

This is a tablet taken with meals.  It can be taken up to 3 times per day.  It is recommended to take 1 month off from the treatment every 2 months.

 

SEMAGLUTIDE

WHAT IS SEMAGLUTIDE?

Semaglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, also referred to as an incretin mimetic.  GLP-1 agonists were initially developed to improve glycemic control with type 2 diabetics as an adjunct to diet and exercise.  It works to enhance the growth of beta cells in the pancreas, the sites of insulin production.

 

GLP-1s are not stimulants, non-habit forming and are clinically-proven to be the most effective medications for long-term results. They work on the same receptors as powerful, naturally-occurring GLP-1 hormones that exist in your body, which improve your metabolic function, and regulate your digestion so you can feel full longer and maximize nutrient absorption. GLP-1s also have far-reaching benefits including reducing inflammation and cardiovascular disease risk to help you not only lose weight, but also live a longer and healthier life.

 

Unlike other weight loss medications, like phentermine, the medication is not a stimulant and contributes to long lasting and dramatic weight loss.  Semaglutide offers glycemic control with improvement to HbA1c levels, moderate weight loss and a significant reduction in risk of major adverse cardiac events as evaluated in a 2-year cardiovascular outcomes trial vs. placebo. More recently, high-dose Semaglutide has been studied in non-diabetic patients suffering from obesity. The New England Journal of Medicine’s publication of the STEP trial revealed more than 50 percent of trial participants lost 15 percent of their body weight, and between 33 to 40 percent lost 20 percent of their body weight in 1 year.

 

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF SEMAGLUTIDE?

-Weight Loss

-Decreased Insulin Resistance

-Anti-Inflammatory Effects

-Decreased Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

 

WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF SEMAGLUTIDE?

GLP-1 agonists are safe and FDA approved.  They have been in use since 2005.  Most patients do not suffer any side effects from the medication, and are rare.  In some patients, they may develop nausea when starting the medication.  This resolves following a few weeks of treatment.  Less than 5% of patients discontinued the medication due to side effects.

 

HOW DO YOU TAKE SEMAGLUTIDE?

Semaglutide is an injectable medication that you take once per week.  The dosage is individualized to the patient, and is typically titrated up with time.

 

Clinical Research:

Chen WL, Kang CH, Wang SG, Lee HM. α-Lipoic acid regulates lipid metabolism through induction of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase. Diabetologia. 2012 Jun;55(6):1824-35. doi: 10.1007/s00125-012-2530-4. Epub 2012 Mar 30. PMID: 22456698.

Neelakantan H, Vance V, Wetzel MD, Wang HL, McHardy SF, Finnerty CC, Hommel JD, Watowich SJ. Selective and membrane-permeable small molecule inhibitors of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase reverse high fat diet-induced obesity in mice. Biochem Pharmacol. 2018 Jan;147:141-152. doi: 10.1016/j.bcp.2017.11.007. Epub 2017 Nov 15. PMID: 29155147; PMCID: PMC5826726.

Cefalu WT, Bray GA, Home PD, Garvey WT, Klein S, Pi-Sunyer FX, Hu FB, Raz I, Van Gaal L, Wolfe BM, Ryan DH. Advances in the Science, Treatment, and Prevention of the Disease of Obesity: Reflections From a Diabetes Care Editors’ Expert Forum. Diabetes Care. 2015 Aug;38(8):1567-82. doi: 10.2337/dc15-1081. PMID: 26421334; PMCID: PMC4831905.

Kahn SE, Hull RL, Utzschneider KM. Mechanisms linking obesity to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Nature. 2006 Dec 14;444(7121):840-6. doi: 10.1038/nature05482. PMID: 17167471.

John P.H. Wilding, D.M., Rachel L. Batterham, M.B., B.S., Ph.D., Salvatore Calanna, Ph.D., Melanie Davies, M.D., Luc F. Van Gaal, M.D., Ph.D., Ildiko Lingvay, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.C.S., Barbara M. McGowan, M.D., Ph.D., Julio Rosenstock, M.D., Marie T.D. Tran, M.D., Ph.D., Thomas A. Wadden, Ph.D., Sean Wharton, M.D., Pharm.D., Koutaro Yokote, M.D., Ph.D., et al., for the STEP 1 Study Group.  Once-Weekly Semaglutide in Adults with Overweight or Obesity.  March 18, 2021.  N Engl J Med 2021; 384:989-1002.  DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa2032183

Find Your Pain Solution

  • Spine
  • Shoulder
  • Elbow/Wrist/Hand
  • Herniated Disc
  • Radiculopathy
  • Facet Joint Dysfunction
  • Stenosis
  • Muscle Stiffness/Tightness Headaches
  • Sacro-Iliac Joint Pain (SIJ)
  • Nerve Entrapment
  • Back Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Post-Surgical Care
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Rotator Cuff Tear/Sprain
  • Biceps Tendonitis
  • Shoulder Labral Tear
  • Shoulder Impingement/Bursitis
  • Adhesive Capsulitis/Frozen Shoulder
  • Scapular Dyskinesia
  • AC Joint Separation
  • Stenosis
  • Post-Surgical Care
  • Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)
  • Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer’s Elbow)
  • Climber’s Fracture
  • Trigger Finger
  • Wrist Sprain
  • Wrist Fractures
  • Knee
  • Hip
  • Ankle/Foot/Balance
  • Knee Pain
  • Total Knee Replacement
  • ACL Sprain/Tear
  • MCL Sprain/Tear
  • PCL Sprain/Tear
  • Meniscus Tear
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osgood Schlatter’s
  • Jumper’s Knee
  • Patello-Femoral Pain Syndrome
  • IT Band Syndrome
  • Hamstring Strain
  • Osgood Schlatter’s
  • Quadriceps Strain
  • Baker’s Cyst
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Total Hip Replacement
  • Femoral-Acetabular Impingement (FAI)
  • Piriformis Syndrome
  • Hip Trochanteric Bursitis
  • Gluteus Medius Tear
  • Nerve Entrapment
  • Hip Labral Tear
  • Stenosis
  • Post-Surgical Care
  • Shin Splints
  • Ankle Sprains
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Heel Spur
  • Turf Toe
  • Bunions
  • Falls
  • Achilles Tendonitis
  • Parkinson’s
  • Stroke
  • Spine
  • Herniated Disc
  • Radiculopathy
  • Facet Joint Dysfunction
  • Stenosis
  • Muscle Stiffness/Tightness Headaches
  • Sacro-Iliac Joint Pain (SIJ)
  • Nerve Entrapment
  • Back Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Post-Surgical Care
  • Shoulder
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Rotator Cuff Tear/Sprain
  • Biceps Tendonitis
  • Shoulder Labral Tear
  • Shoulder Impingement/Bursitis
  • Adhesive Capsulitis/Frozen Shoulder
  • Scapular Dyskinesia
  • AC Joint Separation
  • Stenosis
  • Post-Surgical Care
  • Ankle/Foot/Balance
  • Shin Splints
  • Ankle Sprains
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Heel Spur
  • Turf Toe
  • Bunions
  • Falls
  • Achilles Tendonitis
  • Parkinson’s
  • Stroke
  • Elbow/Wrist/Hand
  • Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)
  • Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer’s Elbow)
  • Climber’s Fracture
  • Trigger Finger
  • Wrist Sprain
  • Wrist Fractures
  • Knee
  • Knee Pain
  • Total Knee Replacement
  • ACL Sprain/Tear
  • MCL Sprain/Tear
  • PCL Sprain/Tear
  • Meniscus Tear
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osgood Schlatter’s
  • Jumper’s Knee
  • Patello-Femoral Pain Syndrome
  • IT Band Syndrome
  • Hamstring Strain
  • Osgood Schlatter’s
  • Quadriceps Strain
  • Baker’s Cyst
  • Hip
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Total Hip Replacement
  • Femoral-Acetabular Impingement (FAI)
  • Piriformis Syndrome
  • Hip Trochanteric Bursitis
  • Gluteus Medius Tear
  • Nerve Entrapment
  • Hip Labral Tear
  • Stenosis
  • Post-Surgical Care

Schedule a Consultation with a USA Sports Therapy Specialist Today

Citations

  • Studies Cited:
  • 1. Hernigou P, Bouthors C, Bastard C, Flouzat Lachaniette CH, Rouard H, Dubory A. Subchondral bone or intra-articular injection of bone marrow concentrate mesenchymal stem cells in bilateral knee osteoarthritis: what better postpone knee arthroplasty at fifteen years? A randomized study. Int Orthop. 2021 Feb;45(2):391-399. doi: 10.1007/s00264-020-04687-7. Epub 2020 Jul 2. PMID: 32617651.
  • 2.Prodromos, Chadwick & Finkle, Susan. (2020). Autologous Biologic Treatment with Fat, Bone Marrow Aspirate and Platelet Rich Plasma Is an Effective Alternative to Total Knee Arthroplasty for Patients with Moderate Knee Arthrosis. Medicines. 7. 37. 10.3390/medicines7060037.
  • 3. Y.S. Kim, Y.J. Choi, S.W. Lee, O.R. Kwon, D.S. Suh, D.B. Heo, Y.G. Koh. Assessment of clinical and MRI outcomes after mesenchymal stem cell implantation in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a prospective study, Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, Volume 24, Issue 2, 2016, Pages 237-245, ISSN 1063-4584, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2015.08.009.
  • 4. Vangsness CT Jr, Farr J 2nd, Boyd J, Dellaero DT, Mills CR, LeRoux-Williams M. Adult human mesenchymal stem cells delivered via intra-articular injection to the knee following partial medial meniscectomy: a randomized, double-blind, controlled study. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2014 Jan 15;96(2):90-8. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.M.00058. PMID: 24430407.
  • 5. Hernigou P, Flouzat Lachaniette CH, Delambre J, Zilber S, Duffiet P, Chevallier N, Rouard H. Biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair with mesenchymal stem cells during arthroscopy improves healing and prevents further tears: a case-controlled study. Int Orthop. 2014 Sep;38(9):1811-8. doi: 10.1007/s00264-014-2391-1. Epub 2014 Jun 7. PMID: 24913770.
  • 6. Centeno C, Fausel Z, Stemper I, Azuike U, Dodson E. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Treatment of Rotator Cuff Tears with Bone Marrow Concentrate and Platelet Products Compared to Exercise Therapy: A Midterm Analysis. Stem Cells Int. 2020;2020:5962354. Published 2020 Jan 30. doi:10.1155/2020/5962354
  • 7. Centeno CJ, Pitts JA, Al-Sayegh H, Freeman MD (2014) Efficacy and Safety of Bone Marrow Concentrate for Osteoarthritisof the Hip; Treatment Registry Results for 196 Patients. J Stem Cell Res Ther 4: 242. doi:10.4172/2157-7633.1000242
  • 8. Darrow M, Shaw B, Darrow B, Wisz S. Short-Term Outcomes of Treatment of Hip Osteoarthritis With 4 Bone Marrow Concentrate Injections: A Case Series. Clin Med Insights Case Rep. 2018;11:1179547618791574. Published 2018 Aug 10. doi:10.1177/1179547618791574
  • 9. Centeno CJ, Al-Sayegh H, Bashir J, Goodyear S, Freeman MD. A prospective multi-site registry study of a specific protocol of autologous bone marrow concentrate for the treatment of shoulder rotator cuff tears and osteoarthritis. J Pain Res. 2015;8:269-276. Published 2015 Jun 5. doi:10.2147/JPR.S80872
  • 10. Singh A, Gangwar DS, Singh S. Bone marrow injection: A novel treatment for tennis elbow. J Nat Sci Biol Med. 2014;5(2):389-391. doi:10.4103/0976-9668.136198
  • 11. Lin, Junhong. International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Munich Vol. 56, Iss. 8, (Aug 2018): 366.
  • 12. Kothari SY, Srikumar V, Singh N. Comparative Efficacy of Platelet Rich Plasma Injection, Corticosteroid Injection and Ultrasonic Therapy in the Treatment of Periarthritis Shoulder. J Clin Diagn Res. 2017;11(5):RC15-RC18. doi:10.7860/JCDR/2017/17060.9895
  • 13. Peerbooms JC, (2010) Positive effect of an autologous platelet concentrate in lateral epicondylitis in a double-blind randomized controlled trial: platelet-rich plasma versus corticosteroid injection with a 1-Year follow-up. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20448192
  • 14. Gosens T, et al. (2011) Ongoing positive effect of platelet-rich plasma versus corticosteroid injection in lateral epicondylitis: a double-blind randomized controlled trial with 2-year follow-up. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21422467
  • 15. Mishra A, et al. (2014) Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma for chronic tennis elbow: a double-blind, prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial of 230 patients. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23825183
  • 16. Sanchez M, et al. (2007) Comparison of surgically repaired Achilles tendon tears using platelet rich fibrin matrices. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17099241
  • 17. Dragoo JL, Wasterlain AS, Braun HJ, Nead KT. Platelet-Rich Plasma as a Treatment for Patellar Tendinopathy: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2014;42(3):610-618. doi:10.1177/0363546513518416
  • 18. Akşahin, Ertuğrul, et al. “The comparison of the effect of corticosteroids and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the treatment of plantar fasciitis.” Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgery 132.6 (2012): 781-785.
  • 19. Ragab, Ehab Mohamed Selem, and Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed Othman. “Platelets rich plasma for treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis.” Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgery 132.8 (2012): 1065-1070.
  • 20. Doaa H. Ibrahim, Nagat M. El-Gazzar, Hanan M. El-Saadany, Radwa M. El-Khouly, Ultrasound-guided injection of platelet rich plasma versus corticosteroid for treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy: Effect on shoulder pain, disability, range of motion and ultrasonographic findings. The Egyptian Rheumatologist, Volume 41, Issue 2, 2019, Pages 157-161, ISSN 1110-1164, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejr.2018.06.004.
  • 21. Dadgostar, H., Fahimipour, F., Pahlevan Sabagh, A. et al. Corticosteroids or platelet-rich plasma injections for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a randomized clinical trial study. J Orthop Surg Res 16, 333 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13018-021-02470-x
  • 22. Begkas D, Chatzopoulos ST, Touzopoulos P, Balanika A, Pastroudis A. Ultrasound-guided Platelet-rich Plasma Application Versus Corticosteroid Injections for the Treatment of Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome: A Prospective Controlled Randomized Comparative Clinical Study. Cureus. 2020;12(1):e6583. Published 2020 Jan 7. doi:10.7759/cureus.6583
  • 23. ROSÁRIO, DAVI ARAÚJO VEIGA et al. COMPARISON BETWEEN CONCENTRATED BONE MARROW ASPIRATE AND CORTICOID IN GLUTEAL TENDINOPATHY. Acta Ortopédica Brasileira [online]. 2021, v. 29, n. 1 [Accessed 1 December 2021] , pp. 26-29. Available from: <https://doi.org/10.1590/1413-785220212901236828>. Epub 10 Mar 2021. ISSN 1809-4406. https://doi.org/10.1590/1413-785220212901236828.
  • 24. Tang, J.Z., Nie, M.J., Zhao, J.Z. et al. Platelet-rich plasma versus hyaluronic acid in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a meta-analysis. J Orthop Surg Res 15, 403 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13018-020-01919-9