Enzyme Nutrition Therapy in Miami

USA Sports Medicine Nutrition Facts

With our revolutionary enzyme/nutrition program we are able to help people with chemical problems that cause chronic stomach conditions such as heartburn, acid reflux, irritable bowel, constipation, diarrhea, and weight problems. It also helps symptoms from arthritis, improper digestion, osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, high cholesterol, blood sugar imbalances, skin conditions (acne, boils, eczema, psoriasis), and sleep problems.

Along with vitamins and minerals, enzymes are found in food in its natural state. All raw food contains the proper types and proportions of enzymes necessary to digest itself. This occurs in our stomach when the food is eaten or in nature as the food ripens. The type (protein, sugar, starch, fat) and amount (caloric value) of the major components present in the food determine the type and amount of the various enzymes found in the food. For example, olives and avocados are higher in fat and lipase, while potatoes are higher in carbohydrate and amylase.

Protein, carbohydrates, fat, and fiber are building blocks but they do not possess the energy (capacity to do work) necessary for biochemical reactions. Only enzymes can furnish this energy. When raw food is eaten, chewing ruptures the cell membrane and releases the indigenous food enzymes.

Enzymes are needed to assist every chemical equation in the body. Not a single food, vitamin, mineral or hormone can be utilized without them. They are the workers that make life possible. Enzymes are responsible for digesting, absorbing, and eliminating food. They deliver vital nutrients across incomplete digestive systems and therefore nourish and support stressed organs. Digesting food can require 80% of your energy to complete.

By supplementing with Natural Enzymes, you can decrease the amount of energy your body spends on digestion. This will allow your body to burn more calories, improve immune function, increase your energy and improve your sleep. Over 50 different formulas were designed to nourish specific organs, systems, and/ or glands. Our system is the ONLY technique that combines test results with precise enzyme formulas

Why Enzymes

Everyone agrees that proper nutrition is crucial to the maintenance of a healthy body. However, most healthcare practitioners overlook the true cause of many nutritional disorders. It is assumed, quite mistakenly, that digestion occurs automatically and the correction of a nutritional disorder simply requires matching the right nutritional supplement to the condition. For example, vitamin C for colds, vitamin A for viruses and herbal laxatives for constipation. While this treatment may relieve patient symptoms, the relief is only temporary because the underlying problem of faulty digestion is ignored. Healthcare practitioners who want to effectively manage health problems that are related to nutritional imbalances must consider each person’s ability to digest food. Unfortunately, most clinicians give little or no thought to the role of enzymes in digestion, despite overwhelming evidence of their importance.

Enzymes are present in all living animal and plant cells. They are the primary motivators of all-natural biochemical processes. Life cannot exist without enzymes because they are essential components of every chemical reaction in the body. For example, they are the only substance that can digest food and make it small enough to pass through the gastrointestinal mucosa into the bloodstream. Three very broad classifications of enzymes are:

Food Enzymes – occur in raw food and, when present in the diet, begin the process of digestion

Digestive Enzymes – produced by the body to break food into particles small enough to be carried across the gut wall

Metabolic Enzymes – produced by the body to perform various complex biochemical reactions

Enzyme Groups

Proteases – break long protein chains into smaller amino acid chains and eventually into single amino acids

Amylases – reduce polysaccharides to disaccharides (sugars and some carbohydrates): lactose, maltose, and sucrose

Lipases – break triglycerides (fat) into individual fatty acids and glycerol

Cellulases – digest specific carbohydrate bonds found in fiber

Besides needing a substrate to “work” on, enzymes require heat, proper pH and moisture in order to activate.

Heat: All enzymes work within limited temperature ranges. The optimal temperature range for most plant enzymes is 92°F to 104°F, which means that these enzymes work best at body temperature. However, enzymes cannot tolerate the high temperatures used in cooking, baking, microwaving, canning, and pasteurizing. These methods all produce heat of 118°F or higher which destroys the enzymes.

Proper pH: Plant enzymes work in a very broad pH range, 3.0 to 9.0, which coincides very nicely with the human gastrointestinal tract. This is an important factor to remember when comparing plant enzymes with the body’s own digestive enzymes or with supplemental animal enzymes, such as pancreatin. Plant enzymes work in both the stomach and intestines. Pancreatic enzymes, whether produced by the body or provided as a dietary supplement, only work in the small intestine.

Moisture: Plant enzymes must have moisture in order to perform their digestive function. Quite simply, digestion is the process of breaking molecules apart with the addition of water hydrolysis. The body satisfies this need with saliva.

Find Your Pain Solution

  • Spine
  • Shoulder
  • Elbow/Wrist/Hand
  • Herniated Disc
  • Radiculopathy
  • Facet Joint Dysfunction
  • Stenosis
  • Muscle Stiffness/Tightness Headaches
  • Sacro-Iliac Joint Pain (SIJ)
  • Nerve Entrapment
  • Back Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Post-Surgical Care
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Rotator Cuff Tear/Sprain
  • Biceps Tendonitis
  • Shoulder Labral Tear
  • Shoulder Impingement/Bursitis
  • Adhesive Capsulitis/Frozen Shoulder
  • Scapular Dyskinesia
  • AC Joint Separation
  • Stenosis
  • Post-Surgical Care
  • Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)
  • Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer’s Elbow)
  • Climber’s Fracture
  • Trigger Finger
  • Wrist Sprain
  • Wrist Fractures
  • Knee
  • Hip
  • Ankle/Foot/Balance
  • Knee Pain
  • Total Knee Replacement
  • ACL Sprain/Tear
  • MCL Sprain/Tear
  • PCL Sprain/Tear
  • Meniscus Tear
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osgood Schlatter’s
  • Jumper’s Knee
  • Patello-Femoral Pain Syndrome
  • IT Band Syndrome
  • Hamstring Strain
  • Osgood Schlatter’s
  • Quadriceps Strain
  • Baker’s Cyst
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Total Hip Replacement
  • Femoral-Acetabular Impingement (FAI)
  • Piriformis Syndrome
  • Hip Trochanteric Bursitis
  • Gluteus Medius Tear
  • Nerve Entrapment
  • Hip Labral Tear
  • Stenosis
  • Post-Surgical Care
  • Shin Splints
  • Ankle Sprains
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Heel Spur
  • Turf Toe
  • Bunions
  • Falls
  • Achilles Tendonitis
  • Parkinson’s
  • Stroke
  • Spine
  • Herniated Disc
  • Radiculopathy
  • Facet Joint Dysfunction
  • Stenosis
  • Muscle Stiffness/Tightness Headaches
  • Sacro-Iliac Joint Pain (SIJ)
  • Nerve Entrapment
  • Back Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Post-Surgical Care
  • Shoulder
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Rotator Cuff Tear/Sprain
  • Biceps Tendonitis
  • Shoulder Labral Tear
  • Shoulder Impingement/Bursitis
  • Adhesive Capsulitis/Frozen Shoulder
  • Scapular Dyskinesia
  • AC Joint Separation
  • Stenosis
  • Post-Surgical Care
  • Ankle/Foot/Balance
  • Shin Splints
  • Ankle Sprains
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Heel Spur
  • Turf Toe
  • Bunions
  • Falls
  • Achilles Tendonitis
  • Parkinson’s
  • Stroke
  • Elbow/Wrist/Hand
  • Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)
  • Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer’s Elbow)
  • Climber’s Fracture
  • Trigger Finger
  • Wrist Sprain
  • Wrist Fractures
  • Knee
  • Knee Pain
  • Total Knee Replacement
  • ACL Sprain/Tear
  • MCL Sprain/Tear
  • PCL Sprain/Tear
  • Meniscus Tear
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osgood Schlatter’s
  • Jumper’s Knee
  • Patello-Femoral Pain Syndrome
  • IT Band Syndrome
  • Hamstring Strain
  • Osgood Schlatter’s
  • Quadriceps Strain
  • Baker’s Cyst
  • Hip
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Total Hip Replacement
  • Femoral-Acetabular Impingement (FAI)
  • Piriformis Syndrome
  • Hip Trochanteric Bursitis
  • Gluteus Medius Tear
  • Nerve Entrapment
  • Hip Labral Tear
  • Stenosis
  • Post-Surgical Care

Schedule a Consultation with a USA Sports Therapy Specialist Today

Citations

  • Studies Cited:
  • 1. Hernigou P, Bouthors C, Bastard C, Flouzat Lachaniette CH, Rouard H, Dubory A. Subchondral bone or intra-articular injection of bone marrow concentrate mesenchymal stem cells in bilateral knee osteoarthritis: what better postpone knee arthroplasty at fifteen years? A randomized study. Int Orthop. 2021 Feb;45(2):391-399. doi: 10.1007/s00264-020-04687-7. Epub 2020 Jul 2. PMID: 32617651.
  • 2.Prodromos, Chadwick & Finkle, Susan. (2020). Autologous Biologic Treatment with Fat, Bone Marrow Aspirate and Platelet Rich Plasma Is an Effective Alternative to Total Knee Arthroplasty for Patients with Moderate Knee Arthrosis. Medicines. 7. 37. 10.3390/medicines7060037.
  • 3. Y.S. Kim, Y.J. Choi, S.W. Lee, O.R. Kwon, D.S. Suh, D.B. Heo, Y.G. Koh. Assessment of clinical and MRI outcomes after mesenchymal stem cell implantation in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a prospective study, Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, Volume 24, Issue 2, 2016, Pages 237-245, ISSN 1063-4584, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2015.08.009.
  • 4. Vangsness CT Jr, Farr J 2nd, Boyd J, Dellaero DT, Mills CR, LeRoux-Williams M. Adult human mesenchymal stem cells delivered via intra-articular injection to the knee following partial medial meniscectomy: a randomized, double-blind, controlled study. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2014 Jan 15;96(2):90-8. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.M.00058. PMID: 24430407.
  • 5. Hernigou P, Flouzat Lachaniette CH, Delambre J, Zilber S, Duffiet P, Chevallier N, Rouard H. Biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair with mesenchymal stem cells during arthroscopy improves healing and prevents further tears: a case-controlled study. Int Orthop. 2014 Sep;38(9):1811-8. doi: 10.1007/s00264-014-2391-1. Epub 2014 Jun 7. PMID: 24913770.
  • 6. Centeno C, Fausel Z, Stemper I, Azuike U, Dodson E. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Treatment of Rotator Cuff Tears with Bone Marrow Concentrate and Platelet Products Compared to Exercise Therapy: A Midterm Analysis. Stem Cells Int. 2020;2020:5962354. Published 2020 Jan 30. doi:10.1155/2020/5962354
  • 7. Centeno CJ, Pitts JA, Al-Sayegh H, Freeman MD (2014) Efficacy and Safety of Bone Marrow Concentrate for Osteoarthritisof the Hip; Treatment Registry Results for 196 Patients. J Stem Cell Res Ther 4: 242. doi:10.4172/2157-7633.1000242
  • 8. Darrow M, Shaw B, Darrow B, Wisz S. Short-Term Outcomes of Treatment of Hip Osteoarthritis With 4 Bone Marrow Concentrate Injections: A Case Series. Clin Med Insights Case Rep. 2018;11:1179547618791574. Published 2018 Aug 10. doi:10.1177/1179547618791574
  • 9. Centeno CJ, Al-Sayegh H, Bashir J, Goodyear S, Freeman MD. A prospective multi-site registry study of a specific protocol of autologous bone marrow concentrate for the treatment of shoulder rotator cuff tears and osteoarthritis. J Pain Res. 2015;8:269-276. Published 2015 Jun 5. doi:10.2147/JPR.S80872
  • 10. Singh A, Gangwar DS, Singh S. Bone marrow injection: A novel treatment for tennis elbow. J Nat Sci Biol Med. 2014;5(2):389-391. doi:10.4103/0976-9668.136198
  • 11. Lin, Junhong. International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Munich Vol. 56, Iss. 8, (Aug 2018): 366.
  • 12. Kothari SY, Srikumar V, Singh N. Comparative Efficacy of Platelet Rich Plasma Injection, Corticosteroid Injection and Ultrasonic Therapy in the Treatment of Periarthritis Shoulder. J Clin Diagn Res. 2017;11(5):RC15-RC18. doi:10.7860/JCDR/2017/17060.9895
  • 13. Peerbooms JC, (2010) Positive effect of an autologous platelet concentrate in lateral epicondylitis in a double-blind randomized controlled trial: platelet-rich plasma versus corticosteroid injection with a 1-Year follow-up. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20448192
  • 14. Gosens T, et al. (2011) Ongoing positive effect of platelet-rich plasma versus corticosteroid injection in lateral epicondylitis: a double-blind randomized controlled trial with 2-year follow-up. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21422467
  • 15. Mishra A, et al. (2014) Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma for chronic tennis elbow: a double-blind, prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial of 230 patients. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23825183
  • 16. Sanchez M, et al. (2007) Comparison of surgically repaired Achilles tendon tears using platelet rich fibrin matrices. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17099241
  • 17. Dragoo JL, Wasterlain AS, Braun HJ, Nead KT. Platelet-Rich Plasma as a Treatment for Patellar Tendinopathy: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2014;42(3):610-618. doi:10.1177/0363546513518416
  • 18. Akşahin, Ertuğrul, et al. “The comparison of the effect of corticosteroids and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the treatment of plantar fasciitis.” Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgery 132.6 (2012): 781-785.
  • 19. Ragab, Ehab Mohamed Selem, and Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed Othman. “Platelets rich plasma for treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis.” Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgery 132.8 (2012): 1065-1070.
  • 20. Doaa H. Ibrahim, Nagat M. El-Gazzar, Hanan M. El-Saadany, Radwa M. El-Khouly, Ultrasound-guided injection of platelet rich plasma versus corticosteroid for treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy: Effect on shoulder pain, disability, range of motion and ultrasonographic findings. The Egyptian Rheumatologist, Volume 41, Issue 2, 2019, Pages 157-161, ISSN 1110-1164, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejr.2018.06.004.
  • 21. Dadgostar, H., Fahimipour, F., Pahlevan Sabagh, A. et al. Corticosteroids or platelet-rich plasma injections for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a randomized clinical trial study. J Orthop Surg Res 16, 333 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13018-021-02470-x
  • 22. Begkas D, Chatzopoulos ST, Touzopoulos P, Balanika A, Pastroudis A. Ultrasound-guided Platelet-rich Plasma Application Versus Corticosteroid Injections for the Treatment of Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome: A Prospective Controlled Randomized Comparative Clinical Study. Cureus. 2020;12(1):e6583. Published 2020 Jan 7. doi:10.7759/cureus.6583
  • 23. ROSÁRIO, DAVI ARAÚJO VEIGA et al. COMPARISON BETWEEN CONCENTRATED BONE MARROW ASPIRATE AND CORTICOID IN GLUTEAL TENDINOPATHY. Acta Ortopédica Brasileira [online]. 2021, v. 29, n. 1 [Accessed 1 December 2021] , pp. 26-29. Available from: <https://doi.org/10.1590/1413-785220212901236828>. Epub 10 Mar 2021. ISSN 1809-4406. https://doi.org/10.1590/1413-785220212901236828.
  • 24. Tang, J.Z., Nie, M.J., Zhao, J.Z. et al. Platelet-rich plasma versus hyaluronic acid in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a meta-analysis. J Orthop Surg Res 15, 403 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13018-020-01919-9